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Supporting SMEs Toward Greater Productivity

We exist to keep people safe from bad behaviour at work and to protect the organisations they work in.

Small to medium enterprises make a significant contribution to the economy, accounting for just less than 50% of private sector industry employment and contributing approximately 33% of private sector industry value to the economy. SMEs generally do not have access to services that they need from a governance perspective and from an employee health and well-being perspective. Unfortunately, for many people working in SMEs, a day at the office can be unpleasant.

It doesn’t have to be that way! Our Great Day@Work platform is positively disrupting how people are kept safe at work, how people access help and how organisations are protected. Our platform services SMEs and big business throughout Australia.

Thinking of accessing an EAP for example ? the frequently asked questions are answered below:

Cost
The cost of an Employee Assistance Program is usually based on utilization. Usually15% of employees access an EAP program in a given quarter for an average duration of 3 consultations. Additional consultations may be arranged between employee and counselor. EAP’s are intended to be a confidential service supporting employees and their families in response to:

  • Interpersonal conflict with peers and supervisors
  • Work change / stress
  • Harassment / grievance issues
  • Disciplinary matters
  • Work performance and role issues
  • Management coaching
  • Career transition issues
  • Relationship and family matters
  • Personal / emotional stress
  • Psychological health issues (anxiety/depression)
  • Grief and loss
  • Alcohol and drug related issues
  • Work related debriefing post incident
  • Crisis intervention and trauma counselling for personal problems

Happy People Save Money

If 5% of your employees used the EAP the potential monetary savings would be 3.45% of payroll for reduced absenteeism and improved productivity from problem employees.

Reduce Absenteeism
15% of the work force causes 90% of absenteeism. Emotional factors account for 61% of time lost through absenteeism. Statistics suggest that the typical employee is absent 8 days per year. Their studies also show that absenteeism costs the employer 1.75% of an absent employee’s wages. Companies spend 5.6% of their payroll on absenteeism.

Increase Productivity
It is estimated that 10% to 15% of employees are likely to have severe emotional wellbeing problems. The work performance of these employees is at least 35% below expected levels. The reduced productivity of troubled employees costs companies 3.5% to 5% of payroll.
An employee with problems disrupts the working environment of others.

Reduce Turnover
Only 15% of terminations are the result of employees’ inability to perform their job function. Personal and interpersonal factors account for 65% to 80% of all terminations. EAP helps employees resolve personal and interpersonal problems before they think leaving you is the answer.

Disability
Stress contributes to 85% of accidents. An effective EAP will reduce the stress of your people. This will reduce the claims and rates of your extended work cover claims. Your long-term absentees will reduced as a result of the lower risk of your employees.

 We want to help you help your team toward greater engagement and productivity.

 

 

Emma Watson – He for She – A Gender Equality Movement

I think Emma Watson spoke for all forward thinking people in our community when she inspired and moved the UN audience through her presentation in 2014. Her presentation to the UN was a nervous one, but one full of hope and expectation and was a call to action. Scroll to the end of this Blog to see her UN presentation. But here Emmsa speaks further about the ‘He for She’ movement on International Women’s day in 2015.

EWThe Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) in Australia recently released its groundbreaking research on gender equality. After you watch Emma, scroll down for fast facts from this significant research:

Fast Facts:

  • women comprise a quarter of management positions despite making up half the workforce;
  • Women are paid 24.7 per cent less than men who perform the same work;
  • 13.6 per cent of employers have a strategy for flexible working and only 7.1 per cent of employers have an articulated stand-alone strategy to achieve gender equality.

Just under half the 11000 employers covered by the report offered paid parental leave on top of the scheme introduced by the former Labor government.

Gender Equality Agency director Helen Conway said the message from the report was that “at every level the workplace pipeline is blocked for women”.

Key Findings:

  • While making up 48.5 per cent of the workforce, women account for just 35.8 per cent of full-time employees and only 17.3% of CEO/Head of Business positions
  • Men fill 76.24%of directorships, 88.12%of board chairmanships and 82.7% of chief executive positions.
  • The proportion of women declines as management levels approach the chief executive level, with women comprising less than 30% of CEOs’ direct report.
  • The gender pay gap is almost 19.9% for base pay but rises to almost 25 % for total remuneration.
  • The biggest total remuneration gender gap is in financial and insurance services (36.1 per cent), while the narrowest gap is in education and training (9.6 per cent).
  • While almost one in every two employers has a gender remuneration strategy, only 18.1 per cent have pay equity objectives as part of the strategy.

It’s time men ‘Leaned In’ to address gender inequality

I attended the recent Marie Claire success summit in Sydney. I wanted to attend because I feel strongly that women in work in Australia need men to be actively engaged on this issue of gender equality. I felt I needed to be a part of the conversation that is going on. I was one of 2 men who attended the summit that was attended by over 700 women delegates. We enjoyed listening to amazing women speakers who had powerful messages to share.

Frankly, I was surprised so few men attended. Gender equality is not simply a women’s issue. It is a whole of community issue. The business case is now done and dusted, gender equality is a good thing and we must collectively and resolutely resolve this issue. Just as Sheryl Sandberg through her book called for women to ‘lean in’ and to participate, so it is for men.

Through my work I hear men say “I just don’t see inequality”, “it is not really an issue in 2014”. However, just because gender inequality is not ‘seen’, does not mean it does not exist. It does.

Men in denial or worse, men who are disinterested or disengaged are in fact adding to the problem instead of being involved in the solution. Risk to Business continues to investigate matters of discrimination, sexual harassment and workplace bullying throughout Australia. Our own research in  clearly indicates it is still going on in Australia. On occasion we are perplexed about how those behaviours can still occur in the 21st century.

Gender Inequality – Fast Facts:

• There is an 18.2% pay gap between genders across the board in Australia;
• Of the 226 seats in the Federal Parliament, 69 are held by women, and women comprise 29.0 per cent of all parliamentarians in Australia. Only have one woman holding a top job in the cabinet. Women hold half the voting power in Australia;
• 36 of the ASX200 still have no female representation on Boards and the latest document states the percentage of women on ASX 200 boards is 18.6% (31 August 2014) according to the AICD;
• The average superannuation account balance for women was $40,475, compared to $71,645 for men. Men have round 63% of total superannuation account balances, compared to 37% for women. Most women live longer and will likely retire without sufficient funds to sustain them;
• Like Australia, women in the US continue to outpace men in educational achievement, but women’s participation has stalled in progress at the top of any industry. In the US women hold around 14% of Fortune 500 executive-officer positions and about 17% of board seats, numbers that have barely improved over the last decade.

Women do not need us men to ‘fix’ them, or to fix the ‘problem’, but to work alongside them and with them to overcome the clear inequalities that exist in Australia.

I heard Elizabeth Broderick speak powerfully of her concerns around gender inequality, and how important the male champions of change program is to change. A few days later Elizabeth Broderick received an award and recognition as the most influential woman in 2014. Her Male Champions of Change program, which puts powerful men at the forefront of updating attitudes about the capability and place of women at top levels of business, is being replicated in other states, and in various industries. These male champions are ‘leaning in’. More action is needed.

So, I pose the question. What can you do as a man, a husband, a business owner, operator, manager, a leader, and a father, do to lean in? Think about it and get involved in debate and action. What will your legacy be on this important issue? If you need help on a starting point, contact me.